Open Location Code

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Open Location Code

john whelan-2

Open Location Code or Plus code is just a method of representing latitude and longitude in a more human friendly way.

It was originally created by Google but has been released under an open licence.

It is possible to set osmand to show coordinates as OLC.  This means it can display the OLC code for any node or building in OpenStreetMap and the displayed code can be copied to the clipboard.  No extra tagging is necessary.

OSMand will also accept an OLC code for searching purposes.

It would seem likely that Nominatim will allow searching by OLC in the near future.

Translation is this allows us to give every dwelling in Africa etc its own address.  It is not in itself a complete addressing solution since it doesn't handle things like 2nd floor but it does at least take you to the building.

To make this work will require training material for example how to turn it on in OSMand.  It is not turned on by default.

Because it is calculated from the buildings's latitude and longitude it is embedded in OSM and will not disappear.  It is stable so you can build on it.

Now you need to think about how it can be used and what additional resources will be required to make full use of it.

Cheerio John






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Re: Open Location Code

Blake Girardot
Hi John,

I appreciate your thoughtful and informative remarks as always here
and on the osm-talk thread, especially about the Open Location Code
discussion.

I clearly generally agree they are not a perfect solution and I am not
even sure we know all the possible use cases, but they are a very good
option at the moment, open source, light weight, easy to implement in
tools.

But I must take exception to your paragraph here:

> Translation is this allows us to give every dwelling in Africa etc its own
> address.  It is not in itself a complete addressing solution since it
> doesn't handle things like 2nd floor but it does at least take you to the
> building.

Trying out OLC in some local circumstances, driven from on the ground
up in that location is fine. If they see a possible usefulness to
them, by all means I will do everything I can to support them as they
figure out if it is something of value to the local community.

But the idea of giving every dwelling in Africa an address is not a
good way to frame it. We are not giving anyone anything. If people
wish to use these locally first, or operating locally I will help them
to the best of my ability.

But in no way do I feel we are or should be giving "every dwelling in
Africa etc its own address" and I would like to make that clear from
the start. This is a potential useful system that seems well suited to
solve some use cases in some locations but must be really wanted by
the local community and driven from the ground up, hopefully in
conjunction with other local actors in the area.

Cheers John,
blake



On Sat, Aug 11, 2018 at 2:55 PM, john whelan <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Open Location Code or Plus code is just a method of representing latitude
> and longitude in a more human friendly way.
>
> It was originally created by Google but has been released under an open
> licence.
>
> It is possible to set osmand to show coordinates as OLC.  This means it can
> display the OLC code for any node or building in OpenStreetMap and the
> displayed code can be copied to the clipboard.  No extra tagging is
> necessary.
>
> OSMand will also accept an OLC code for searching purposes.
>
> It would seem likely that Nominatim will allow searching by OLC in the near
> future.
>
> Translation is this allows us to give every dwelling in Africa etc its own
> address.  It is not in itself a complete addressing solution since it
> doesn't handle things like 2nd floor but it does at least take you to the
> building.
>
> To make this work will require training material for example how to turn it
> on in OSMand.  It is not turned on by default.
>
> Because it is calculated from the buildings's latitude and longitude it is
> embedded in OSM and will not disappear.  It is stable so you can build on
> it.
>
> Now you need to think about how it can be used and what additional resources
> will be required to make full use of it.
>
> Cheerio John
>
>
>
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> HOT mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://lists.openstreetmap.org/listinfo/hot
>



--
----------------------------------------------------
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OSM Wiki - https://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/User:Bgirardot
HOTOSM Member - https://hotosm.org/users/blake_girardot
skype: jblakegirardot

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Re: Open Location Code

john whelan-2
I think you have missed a major point.  You do not give anyone an OLC.  It is simply their lat and long encoded in letters.

So every building in the world has a lat and long, it is its location.  This can be expressed as an OLC.

Cheerio John

On Sat, 11 Aug 2018, 4:49 pm Blake Girardot, <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi John,

I appreciate your thoughtful and informative remarks as always here
and on the osm-talk thread, especially about the Open Location Code
discussion.

I clearly generally agree they are not a perfect solution and I am not
even sure we know all the possible use cases, but they are a very good
option at the moment, open source, light weight, easy to implement in
tools.

But I must take exception to your paragraph here:

> Translation is this allows us to give every dwelling in Africa etc its own
> address.  It is not in itself a complete addressing solution since it
> doesn't handle things like 2nd floor but it does at least take you to the
> building.

Trying out OLC in some local circumstances, driven from on the ground
up in that location is fine. If they see a possible usefulness to
them, by all means I will do everything I can to support them as they
figure out if it is something of value to the local community.

But the idea of giving every dwelling in Africa an address is not a
good way to frame it. We are not giving anyone anything. If people
wish to use these locally first, or operating locally I will help them
to the best of my ability.

But in no way do I feel we are or should be giving "every dwelling in
Africa etc its own address" and I would like to make that clear from
the start. This is a potential useful system that seems well suited to
solve some use cases in some locations but must be really wanted by
the local community and driven from the ground up, hopefully in
conjunction with other local actors in the area.

Cheers John,
blake



On Sat, Aug 11, 2018 at 2:55 PM, john whelan <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Open Location Code or Plus code is just a method of representing latitude
> and longitude in a more human friendly way.
>
> It was originally created by Google but has been released under an open
> licence.
>
> It is possible to set osmand to show coordinates as OLC.  This means it can
> display the OLC code for any node or building in OpenStreetMap and the
> displayed code can be copied to the clipboard.  No extra tagging is
> necessary.
>
> OSMand will also accept an OLC code for searching purposes.
>
> It would seem likely that Nominatim will allow searching by OLC in the near
> future.
>
> Translation is this allows us to give every dwelling in Africa etc its own
> address.  It is not in itself a complete addressing solution since it
> doesn't handle things like 2nd floor but it does at least take you to the
> building.
>
> To make this work will require training material for example how to turn it
> on in OSMand.  It is not turned on by default.
>
> Because it is calculated from the buildings's latitude and longitude it is
> embedded in OSM and will not disappear.  It is stable so you can build on
> it.
>
> Now you need to think about how it can be used and what additional resources
> will be required to make full use of it.
>
> Cheerio John
>
>
>
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> HOT mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://lists.openstreetmap.org/listinfo/hot
>



--
----------------------------------------------------
Blake Girardot
OSM Wiki - https://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/User:Bgirardot
HOTOSM Member - https://hotosm.org/users/blake_girardot
skype: jblakegirardot

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Re: Open Location Code

Warin
+ 1 with John Whelan

Every place already has an "address" simply called latitude, longitude.
The Open Location Code is simply another way of expressing that latitude, longitude.

If some platform wants to provide an interface between OSM data to Open Location Code fine.
But I don't expect that the OSM data base will have anything other than latitude, longitude inside it.


On 12/08/18 06:59, john whelan wrote:
I think you have missed a major point.  You do not give anyone an OLC.  It is simply their lat and long encoded in letters.

So every building in the world has a lat and long, it is its location.  This can be expressed as an OLC.

Cheerio John

On Sat, 11 Aug 2018, 4:49 pm Blake Girardot, <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi John,

I appreciate your thoughtful and informative remarks as always here
and on the osm-talk thread, especially about the Open Location Code
discussion.

I clearly generally agree they are not a perfect solution and I am not
even sure we know all the possible use cases, but they are a very good
option at the moment, open source, light weight, easy to implement in
tools.

But I must take exception to your paragraph here:

> Translation is this allows us to give every dwelling in Africa etc its own
> address.  It is not in itself a complete addressing solution since it
> doesn't handle things like 2nd floor but it does at least take you to the
> building.

Trying out OLC in some local circumstances, driven from on the ground
up in that location is fine. If they see a possible usefulness to
them, by all means I will do everything I can to support them as they
figure out if it is something of value to the local community.

But the idea of giving every dwelling in Africa an address is not a
good way to frame it. We are not giving anyone anything. If people
wish to use these locally first, or operating locally I will help them
to the best of my ability.

But in no way do I feel we are or should be giving "every dwelling in
Africa etc its own address" and I would like to make that clear from
the start. This is a potential useful system that seems well suited to
solve some use cases in some locations but must be really wanted by
the local community and driven from the ground up, hopefully in
conjunction with other local actors in the area.

Cheers John,
blake



On Sat, Aug 11, 2018 at 2:55 PM, john whelan <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Open Location Code or Plus code is just a method of representing latitude
> and longitude in a more human friendly way.
>
> It was originally created by Google but has been released under an open
> licence.
>
> It is possible to set osmand to show coordinates as OLC.  This means it can
> display the OLC code for any node or building in OpenStreetMap and the
> displayed code can be copied to the clipboard.  No extra tagging is
> necessary.
>
> OSMand will also accept an OLC code for searching purposes.
>
> It would seem likely that Nominatim will allow searching by OLC in the near
> future.
>
> Translation is this allows us to give every dwelling in Africa etc its own
> address.  It is not in itself a complete addressing solution since it
> doesn't handle things like 2nd floor but it does at least take you to the
> building.
>
> To make this work will require training material for example how to turn it
> on in OSMand.  It is not turned on by default.
>
> Because it is calculated from the buildings's latitude and longitude it is
> embedded in OSM and will not disappear.  It is stable so you can build on
> it.
>
> Now you need to think about how it can be used and what additional resources
> will be required to make full use of it.
>
> Cheerio John
>



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Re: Open Location Code

Victor Sunday
Yes,every point on the surface of the earth is  already coded with x,y and z coordinates ,which to the lay man is imaginary lines of latitudes, longitudes and altitude.With the emerging  and advanced smart technology,its application maybe  represented  and accessible in various formats but the principles remains the same.

I guess,we are on thesame page ?

Victor
 

On Sat, Aug 11, 2018 at 11:35 PM, Warin <[hidden email]> wrote:
+ 1 with John Whelan

Every place already has an "address" simply called latitude, longitude.
The Open Location Code is simply another way of expressing that latitude, longitude.

If some platform wants to provide an interface between OSM data to Open Location Code fine.
But I don't expect that the OSM data base will have anything other than latitude, longitude inside it.


On 12/08/18 06:59, john whelan wrote:
I think you have missed a major point.  You do not give anyone an OLC.  It is simply their lat and long encoded in letters.

So every building in the world has a lat and long, it is its location.  This can be expressed as an OLC.

Cheerio John

On Sat, 11 Aug 2018, 4:49 pm Blake Girardot, <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi John,

I appreciate your thoughtful and informative remarks as always here
and on the osm-talk thread, especially about the Open Location Code
discussion.

I clearly generally agree they are not a perfect solution and I am not
even sure we know all the possible use cases, but they are a very good
option at the moment, open source, light weight, easy to implement in
tools.

But I must take exception to your paragraph here:

> Translation is this allows us to give every dwelling in Africa etc its own
> address.  It is not in itself a complete addressing solution since it
> doesn't handle things like 2nd floor but it does at least take you to the
> building.

Trying out OLC in some local circumstances, driven from on the ground
up in that location is fine. If they see a possible usefulness to
them, by all means I will do everything I can to support them as they
figure out if it is something of value to the local community.

But the idea of giving every dwelling in Africa an address is not a
good way to frame it. We are not giving anyone anything. If people
wish to use these locally first, or operating locally I will help them
to the best of my ability.

But in no way do I feel we are or should be giving "every dwelling in
Africa etc its own address" and I would like to make that clear from
the start. This is a potential useful system that seems well suited to
solve some use cases in some locations but must be really wanted by
the local community and driven from the ground up, hopefully in
conjunction with other local actors in the area.

Cheers John,
blake



On Sat, Aug 11, 2018 at 2:55 PM, john whelan <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Open Location Code or Plus code is just a method of representing latitude
> and longitude in a more human friendly way.
>
> It was originally created by Google but has been released under an open
> licence.
>
> It is possible to set osmand to show coordinates as OLC.  This means it can
> display the OLC code for any node or building in OpenStreetMap and the
> displayed code can be copied to the clipboard.  No extra tagging is
> necessary.
>
> OSMand will also accept an OLC code for searching purposes.
>
> It would seem likely that Nominatim will allow searching by OLC in the near
> future.
>
> Translation is this allows us to give every dwelling in Africa etc its own
> address.  It is not in itself a complete addressing solution since it
> doesn't handle things like 2nd floor but it does at least take you to the
> building.
>
> To make this work will require training material for example how to turn it
> on in OSMand.  It is not turned on by default.
>
> Because it is calculated from the buildings's latitude and longitude it is
> embedded in OSM and will not disappear.  It is stable so you can build on
> it.
>
> Now you need to think about how it can be used and what additional resources
> will be required to make full use of it.
>
> Cheerio John
>



_______________________________________________
HOT mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.openstreetmap.org/listinfo/hot



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Re: Open Location Code

john whelan-2
Except we don't hold the z coordinate in the OSM database.

There are other addressing schemes such as three words but using the lat and long for the address is much simpler.  Encoding it with OLC gives you the advantage of a more human friendly looking address.

There are issues which have been discussed in OSM-talk about adding tags to the database.

In a conventional house number street address you can expect that number 4 main street will be between 2 and 6.  Unfortunately if you have no street names and no house numbers it gets more difficult to confirm you have the correct address using anything but a lat / long based scheme.

Cheerio John

Cheerio John

On Sat, 11 Aug 2018, 6:52 pm Victor Sunday, <[hidden email]> wrote:
Yes,every point on the surface of the earth is  already coded with x,y and z coordinates ,which to the lay man is imaginary lines of latitudes, longitudes and altitude.With the emerging  and advanced smart technology,its application maybe  represented  and accessible in various formats but the principles remains the same.

I guess,we are on thesame page ?

Victor
 

On Sat, Aug 11, 2018 at 11:35 PM, Warin <[hidden email]> wrote:
+ 1 with John Whelan

Every place already has an "address" simply called latitude, longitude.
The Open Location Code is simply another way of expressing that latitude, longitude.

If some platform wants to provide an interface between OSM data to Open Location Code fine.
But I don't expect that the OSM data base will have anything other than latitude, longitude inside it.


On 12/08/18 06:59, john whelan wrote:
I think you have missed a major point.  You do not give anyone an OLC.  It is simply their lat and long encoded in letters.

So every building in the world has a lat and long, it is its location.  This can be expressed as an OLC.

Cheerio John

On Sat, 11 Aug 2018, 4:49 pm Blake Girardot, <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi John,

I appreciate your thoughtful and informative remarks as always here
and on the osm-talk thread, especially about the Open Location Code
discussion.

I clearly generally agree they are not a perfect solution and I am not
even sure we know all the possible use cases, but they are a very good
option at the moment, open source, light weight, easy to implement in
tools.

But I must take exception to your paragraph here:

> Translation is this allows us to give every dwelling in Africa etc its own
> address.  It is not in itself a complete addressing solution since it
> doesn't handle things like 2nd floor but it does at least take you to the
> building.

Trying out OLC in some local circumstances, driven from on the ground
up in that location is fine. If they see a possible usefulness to
them, by all means I will do everything I can to support them as they
figure out if it is something of value to the local community.

But the idea of giving every dwelling in Africa an address is not a
good way to frame it. We are not giving anyone anything. If people
wish to use these locally first, or operating locally I will help them
to the best of my ability.

But in no way do I feel we are or should be giving "every dwelling in
Africa etc its own address" and I would like to make that clear from
the start. This is a potential useful system that seems well suited to
solve some use cases in some locations but must be really wanted by
the local community and driven from the ground up, hopefully in
conjunction with other local actors in the area.

Cheers John,
blake



On Sat, Aug 11, 2018 at 2:55 PM, john whelan <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Open Location Code or Plus code is just a method of representing latitude
> and longitude in a more human friendly way.
>
> It was originally created by Google but has been released under an open
> licence.
>
> It is possible to set osmand to show coordinates as OLC.  This means it can
> display the OLC code for any node or building in OpenStreetMap and the
> displayed code can be copied to the clipboard.  No extra tagging is
> necessary.
>
> OSMand will also accept an OLC code for searching purposes.
>
> It would seem likely that Nominatim will allow searching by OLC in the near
> future.
>
> Translation is this allows us to give every dwelling in Africa etc its own
> address.  It is not in itself a complete addressing solution since it
> doesn't handle things like 2nd floor but it does at least take you to the
> building.
>
> To make this work will require training material for example how to turn it
> on in OSMand.  It is not turned on by default.
>
> Because it is calculated from the buildings's latitude and longitude it is
> embedded in OSM and will not disappear.  It is stable so you can build on
> it.
>
> Now you need to think about how it can be used and what additional resources
> will be required to make full use of it.
>
> Cheerio John
>



_______________________________________________
HOT mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.openstreetmap.org/listinfo/hot


_______________________________________________
HOT mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.openstreetmap.org/listinfo/hot

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Re: Open Location Code

Blake Girardot
In reply to this post by john whelan-2
Hi all,

For anyone that would like to visualize that the Open Location Code
grid looks like, I took some screen shots of it overlayed with some
imagery.

The smallest squares in the examples each have a 10 character OLC
number/letter code. You will notice like every grid, the real world is
not on a grid and many structures are in more than one grid. (Every
grid system has this problem).

The next up larger size of square is the square for an 8 character OLC
number/letter code. It obviously groups a lot more buildings together,
almost the small village scale, but again, they will usually be part
in two, just like a structure.

Anyway, thought folks who like to see things visualized in some way to
help understand them might benefit from looking at what exactly we are
talking about.

I would like to see a way to have a better, more informative grid in
all our tools, so like a TMS layer or support in OpenLayers or leaflet
or something. The grid is based on WGS84 degrees already so anything
that helps draw a graticule can just be adapted to have different
major lines and list the shortened OLC instead of the degrees.

https://twitter.com/BlakeGirardot/status/1028689726088388609

Cheers
blake

Cheers
blake

On Sat, Aug 11, 2018 at 2:55 PM, john whelan <[hidden email]> wrote:

> Open Location Code or Plus code is just a method of representing latitude
> and longitude in a more human friendly way.
>
> It was originally created by Google but has been released under an open
> licence.
>
> It is possible to set osmand to show coordinates as OLC.  This means it can
> display the OLC code for any node or building in OpenStreetMap and the
> displayed code can be copied to the clipboard.  No extra tagging is
> necessary.
>
> OSMand will also accept an OLC code for searching purposes.
>
> It would seem likely that Nominatim will allow searching by OLC in the near
> future.
>
> Translation is this allows us to give every dwelling in Africa etc its own
> address.  It is not in itself a complete addressing solution since it
> doesn't handle things like 2nd floor but it does at least take you to the
> building.
>
> To make this work will require training material for example how to turn it
> on in OSMand.  It is not turned on by default.
>
> Because it is calculated from the buildings's latitude and longitude it is
> embedded in OSM and will not disappear.  It is stable so you can build on
> it.
>
> Now you need to think about how it can be used and what additional resources
> will be required to make full use of it.
>
> Cheerio John
>
>
>
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> HOT mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://lists.openstreetmap.org/listinfo/hot
>



--
----------------------------------------------------
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OSM Wiki - https://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/User:Bgirardot
HOTOSM Member - https://hotosm.org/users/blake_girardot
skype: jblakegirardot

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Re: Open Location Code

john whelan-2
So you could use them as postcode equivalents.  Is any statistical data available associated with an area?  Such as population etc?  The area used to collect the data might be a better choice.

Cheerio John

On Sun, 12 Aug 2018, 1:20 pm Blake Girardot, <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi all,

For anyone that would like to visualize that the Open Location Code
grid looks like, I took some screen shots of it overlayed with some
imagery.

The smallest squares in the examples each have a 10 character OLC
number/letter code. You will notice like every grid, the real world is
not on a grid and many structures are in more than one grid. (Every
grid system has this problem).

The next up larger size of square is the square for an 8 character OLC
number/letter code. It obviously groups a lot more buildings together,
almost the small village scale, but again, they will usually be part
in two, just like a structure.

Anyway, thought folks who like to see things visualized in some way to
help understand them might benefit from looking at what exactly we are
talking about.

I would like to see a way to have a better, more informative grid in
all our tools, so like a TMS layer or support in OpenLayers or leaflet
or something. The grid is based on WGS84 degrees already so anything
that helps draw a graticule can just be adapted to have different
major lines and list the shortened OLC instead of the degrees.

https://twitter.com/BlakeGirardot/status/1028689726088388609

Cheers
blake

Cheers
blake

On Sat, Aug 11, 2018 at 2:55 PM, john whelan <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Open Location Code or Plus code is just a method of representing latitude
> and longitude in a more human friendly way.
>
> It was originally created by Google but has been released under an open
> licence.
>
> It is possible to set osmand to show coordinates as OLC.  This means it can
> display the OLC code for any node or building in OpenStreetMap and the
> displayed code can be copied to the clipboard.  No extra tagging is
> necessary.
>
> OSMand will also accept an OLC code for searching purposes.
>
> It would seem likely that Nominatim will allow searching by OLC in the near
> future.
>
> Translation is this allows us to give every dwelling in Africa etc its own
> address.  It is not in itself a complete addressing solution since it
> doesn't handle things like 2nd floor but it does at least take you to the
> building.
>
> To make this work will require training material for example how to turn it
> on in OSMand.  It is not turned on by default.
>
> Because it is calculated from the buildings's latitude and longitude it is
> embedded in OSM and will not disappear.  It is stable so you can build on
> it.
>
> Now you need to think about how it can be used and what additional resources
> will be required to make full use of it.
>
> Cheerio John
>
>
>
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> HOT mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://lists.openstreetmap.org/listinfo/hot
>



--
----------------------------------------------------
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OSM Wiki - https://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/User:Bgirardot
HOTOSM Member - https://hotosm.org/users/blake_girardot
skype: jblakegirardot

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Re: Open Location Code

Blake Girardot
On Sun, Aug 12, 2018 at 2:43 PM, john whelan <[hidden email]> wrote:
> So you could use them as postcode equivalents.  Is any statistical data
> available associated with an area?  Such as population etc?  The area used
> to collect the data might be a better choice.
>
> Cheerio John

I would not say postcode equivalents.

But for sure it makes research and stats easier because it is easy to
scale up or down the grid size and the OLC numbers get shorter when
you scale up.

And because so many structures are in more than one 10 code size grid
square, even tiny changes to the location of the building (like
mapping and updating with better aligned imagery) will change its
"address" as the building centroid shifts when the building is moved
of course. So it is important that the location codes are near each
other because I see the smallest squares, the 10 digit address size,
changing to any one of about 4 "olc addresses" for at least 1/2 of the
buildings, if the building is moved at all, so you will end up with
"outdated" 10 digit addresses, but luckily you will still be within
13m of the new one.

Two of the best reasons why this is the best open source option available.

Cheers
blake

>
> On Sun, 12 Aug 2018, 1:20 pm Blake Girardot, <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>
>> Hi all,
>>
>> For anyone that would like to visualize that the Open Location Code
>> grid looks like, I took some screen shots of it overlayed with some
>> imagery.
>>
>> The smallest squares in the examples each have a 10 character OLC
>> number/letter code. You will notice like every grid, the real world is
>> not on a grid and many structures are in more than one grid. (Every
>> grid system has this problem).
>>
>> The next up larger size of square is the square for an 8 character OLC
>> number/letter code. It obviously groups a lot more buildings together,
>> almost the small village scale, but again, they will usually be part
>> in two, just like a structure.
>>
>> Anyway, thought folks who like to see things visualized in some way to
>> help understand them might benefit from looking at what exactly we are
>> talking about.
>>
>> I would like to see a way to have a better, more informative grid in
>> all our tools, so like a TMS layer or support in OpenLayers or leaflet
>> or something. The grid is based on WGS84 degrees already so anything
>> that helps draw a graticule can just be adapted to have different
>> major lines and list the shortened OLC instead of the degrees.
>>
>> https://twitter.com/BlakeGirardot/status/1028689726088388609
>>
>> Cheers
>> blake
>>
>> Cheers
>> blake
>>
>> On Sat, Aug 11, 2018 at 2:55 PM, john whelan <[hidden email]>
>> wrote:
>> > Open Location Code or Plus code is just a method of representing
>> > latitude
>> > and longitude in a more human friendly way.
>> >
>> > It was originally created by Google but has been released under an open
>> > licence.
>> >
>> > It is possible to set osmand to show coordinates as OLC.  This means it
>> > can
>> > display the OLC code for any node or building in OpenStreetMap and the
>> > displayed code can be copied to the clipboard.  No extra tagging is
>> > necessary.
>> >
>> > OSMand will also accept an OLC code for searching purposes.
>> >
>> > It would seem likely that Nominatim will allow searching by OLC in the
>> > near
>> > future.
>> >
>> > Translation is this allows us to give every dwelling in Africa etc its
>> > own
>> > address.  It is not in itself a complete addressing solution since it
>> > doesn't handle things like 2nd floor but it does at least take you to
>> > the
>> > building.
>> >
>> > To make this work will require training material for example how to turn
>> > it
>> > on in OSMand.  It is not turned on by default.
>> >
>> > Because it is calculated from the buildings's latitude and longitude it
>> > is
>> > embedded in OSM and will not disappear.  It is stable so you can build
>> > on
>> > it.
>> >
>> > Now you need to think about how it can be used and what additional
>> > resources
>> > will be required to make full use of it.
>> >
>> > Cheerio John
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> >
>> > _______________________________________________
>> > HOT mailing list
>> > [hidden email]
>> > https://lists.openstreetmap.org/listinfo/hot
>> >
>>
>>
>>
>> --
>> ----------------------------------------------------
>> Blake Girardot
>> OSM Wiki - https://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/User:Bgirardot
>> HOTOSM Member - https://hotosm.org/users/blake_girardot
>> skype: jblakegirardot



--
----------------------------------------------------
Blake Girardot
OSM Wiki - https://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/User:Bgirardot
HOTOSM Member - https://hotosm.org/users/blake_girardot
skype: jblakegirardot

_______________________________________________
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Re: Open Location Code

verdy_p
In reply to this post by john whelan-2
postcodes are certainly not equivalent as they are related to a distribution area and logistics, which is not based on a strict géographic grid but on access and population to desserve

Le dim. 12 août 2018 à 20:46, john whelan <[hidden email]> a écrit :
So you could use them as postcode equivalents.  Is any statistical data available associated with an area?  Such as population etc?  The area used to collect the data might be a better choice.

Cheerio John

On Sun, 12 Aug 2018, 1:20 pm Blake Girardot, <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi all,

For anyone that would like to visualize that the Open Location Code
grid looks like, I took some screen shots of it overlayed with some
imagery.

The smallest squares in the examples each have a 10 character OLC
number/letter code. You will notice like every grid, the real world is
not on a grid and many structures are in more than one grid. (Every
grid system has this problem).

The next up larger size of square is the square for an 8 character OLC
number/letter code. It obviously groups a lot more buildings together,
almost the small village scale, but again, they will usually be part
in two, just like a structure.

Anyway, thought folks who like to see things visualized in some way to
help understand them might benefit from looking at what exactly we are
talking about.

I would like to see a way to have a better, more informative grid in
all our tools, so like a TMS layer or support in OpenLayers or leaflet
or something. The grid is based on WGS84 degrees already so anything
that helps draw a graticule can just be adapted to have different
major lines and list the shortened OLC instead of the degrees.

https://twitter.com/BlakeGirardot/status/1028689726088388609

Cheers
blake

Cheers
blake

On Sat, Aug 11, 2018 at 2:55 PM, john whelan <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Open Location Code or Plus code is just a method of representing latitude
> and longitude in a more human friendly way.
>
> It was originally created by Google but has been released under an open
> licence.
>
> It is possible to set osmand to show coordinates as OLC.  This means it can
> display the OLC code for any node or building in OpenStreetMap and the
> displayed code can be copied to the clipboard.  No extra tagging is
> necessary.
>
> OSMand will also accept an OLC code for searching purposes.
>
> It would seem likely that Nominatim will allow searching by OLC in the near
> future.
>
> Translation is this allows us to give every dwelling in Africa etc its own
> address.  It is not in itself a complete addressing solution since it
> doesn't handle things like 2nd floor but it does at least take you to the
> building.
>
> To make this work will require training material for example how to turn it
> on in OSMand.  It is not turned on by default.
>
> Because it is calculated from the buildings's latitude and longitude it is
> embedded in OSM and will not disappear.  It is stable so you can build on
> it.
>
> Now you need to think about how it can be used and what additional resources
> will be required to make full use of it.
>
> Cheerio John
>
>
>
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> HOT mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://lists.openstreetmap.org/listinfo/hot
>



--
----------------------------------------------------
Blake Girardot
OSM Wiki - https://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/User:Bgirardot
HOTOSM Member - https://hotosm.org/users/blake_girardot
skype: jblakegirardot
_______________________________________________
HOT mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.openstreetmap.org/listinfo/hot

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https://lists.openstreetmap.org/listinfo/hot
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Re: Open Location Code

john whelan-2
Agreed but in their complete absence OLC area codes can be a useful substitute.

If you know how many coffee drinkers there are in a given OLC area code then you can decide if its worth opening up a coffee shop.

Starbucks for example will do this sort of research before opening a new store and pay for the information.

Cheerio John

On Mon, Aug 13, 2018, 8:26 PM Philippe Verdy <[hidden email]> wrote:
postcodes are certainly not equivalent as they are related to a distribution area and logistics, which is not based on a strict géographic grid but on access and population to desserve

Le dim. 12 août 2018 à 20:46, john whelan <[hidden email]> a écrit :
So you could use them as postcode equivalents.  Is any statistical data available associated with an area?  Such as population etc?  The area used to collect the data might be a better choice.

Cheerio John

On Sun, 12 Aug 2018, 1:20 pm Blake Girardot, <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi all,

For anyone that would like to visualize that the Open Location Code
grid looks like, I took some screen shots of it overlayed with some
imagery.

The smallest squares in the examples each have a 10 character OLC
number/letter code. You will notice like every grid, the real world is
not on a grid and many structures are in more than one grid. (Every
grid system has this problem).

The next up larger size of square is the square for an 8 character OLC
number/letter code. It obviously groups a lot more buildings together,
almost the small village scale, but again, they will usually be part
in two, just like a structure.

Anyway, thought folks who like to see things visualized in some way to
help understand them might benefit from looking at what exactly we are
talking about.

I would like to see a way to have a better, more informative grid in
all our tools, so like a TMS layer or support in OpenLayers or leaflet
or something. The grid is based on WGS84 degrees already so anything
that helps draw a graticule can just be adapted to have different
major lines and list the shortened OLC instead of the degrees.

https://twitter.com/BlakeGirardot/status/1028689726088388609

Cheers
blake

Cheers
blake

On Sat, Aug 11, 2018 at 2:55 PM, john whelan <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Open Location Code or Plus code is just a method of representing latitude
> and longitude in a more human friendly way.
>
> It was originally created by Google but has been released under an open
> licence.
>
> It is possible to set osmand to show coordinates as OLC.  This means it can
> display the OLC code for any node or building in OpenStreetMap and the
> displayed code can be copied to the clipboard.  No extra tagging is
> necessary.
>
> OSMand will also accept an OLC code for searching purposes.
>
> It would seem likely that Nominatim will allow searching by OLC in the near
> future.
>
> Translation is this allows us to give every dwelling in Africa etc its own
> address.  It is not in itself a complete addressing solution since it
> doesn't handle things like 2nd floor but it does at least take you to the
> building.
>
> To make this work will require training material for example how to turn it
> on in OSMand.  It is not turned on by default.
>
> Because it is calculated from the buildings's latitude and longitude it is
> embedded in OSM and will not disappear.  It is stable so you can build on
> it.
>
> Now you need to think about how it can be used and what additional resources
> will be required to make full use of it.
>
> Cheerio John
>
>
>
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> HOT mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://lists.openstreetmap.org/listinfo/hot
>



--
----------------------------------------------------
Blake Girardot
OSM Wiki - https://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/User:Bgirardot
HOTOSM Member - https://hotosm.org/users/blake_girardot
skype: jblakegirardot
_______________________________________________
HOT mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.openstreetmap.org/listinfo/hot

_______________________________________________
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[hidden email]
https://lists.openstreetmap.org/listinfo/hot
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Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: Open Location Code

verdy_p
May be but there's no need at all of OLC codes in the database itself. The OLC code is a rough rounding of actual coordinates, and coordinates are on all objets with much more precision.

May be you can design a query application that allows you to enter an OLC code and zoom to it, or get the OSM data in the grid cell indicated by the OLC code. This is not to the OSM database to do that (and note that there are also other competing "abbreviation geolocation codes", OLC is just one of them. Even barcodes/QR codes, are also usable and can represent coordinates.

Another copyrighted  (non-free) code uses Emojis instead of letters/digits: may be easy to identify visually but very complicate to input ! It's just simpler and much faster to input these codes by zooming/padding/pointing on the map with a finger or mouse.

And note that geographic planes are probably starting to be something of the past: using grids visually seems to be defavored now for 3D projection without any grid with regular rectangles. Soon too, OSM will go with vector rendering and navigation with cameras on the ground at variable altitude and ascencion instead of just a single vertical and single rotation orentiation. goegraphic planes will just be used to show some statistics of the world on a static map (without the limitation of seeing only one hemisphere, and arbitrary choice of the observer camera direction and distance)

Le lun. 13 août 2018 à 15:56, john whelan <[hidden email]> a écrit :
Agreed but in their complete absence OLC area codes can be a useful substitute.

If you know how many coffee drinkers there are in a given OLC area code then you can decide if its worth opening up a coffee shop.

Starbucks for example will do this sort of research before opening a new store and pay for the information.

Cheerio John

On Mon, Aug 13, 2018, 8:26 PM Philippe Verdy <[hidden email]> wrote:
postcodes are certainly not equivalent as they are related to a distribution area and logistics, which is not based on a strict géographic grid but on access and population to desserve

Le dim. 12 août 2018 à 20:46, john whelan <[hidden email]> a écrit :
So you could use them as postcode equivalents.  Is any statistical data available associated with an area?  Such as population etc?  The area used to collect the data might be a better choice.

Cheerio John

On Sun, 12 Aug 2018, 1:20 pm Blake Girardot, <[hidden email]> wrote:
Hi all,

For anyone that would like to visualize that the Open Location Code
grid looks like, I took some screen shots of it overlayed with some
imagery.

The smallest squares in the examples each have a 10 character OLC
number/letter code. You will notice like every grid, the real world is
not on a grid and many structures are in more than one grid. (Every
grid system has this problem).

The next up larger size of square is the square for an 8 character OLC
number/letter code. It obviously groups a lot more buildings together,
almost the small village scale, but again, they will usually be part
in two, just like a structure.

Anyway, thought folks who like to see things visualized in some way to
help understand them might benefit from looking at what exactly we are
talking about.

I would like to see a way to have a better, more informative grid in
all our tools, so like a TMS layer or support in OpenLayers or leaflet
or something. The grid is based on WGS84 degrees already so anything
that helps draw a graticule can just be adapted to have different
major lines and list the shortened OLC instead of the degrees.

https://twitter.com/BlakeGirardot/status/1028689726088388609

Cheers
blake

Cheers
blake

On Sat, Aug 11, 2018 at 2:55 PM, john whelan <[hidden email]> wrote:
> Open Location Code or Plus code is just a method of representing latitude
> and longitude in a more human friendly way.
>
> It was originally created by Google but has been released under an open
> licence.
>
> It is possible to set osmand to show coordinates as OLC.  This means it can
> display the OLC code for any node or building in OpenStreetMap and the
> displayed code can be copied to the clipboard.  No extra tagging is
> necessary.
>
> OSMand will also accept an OLC code for searching purposes.
>
> It would seem likely that Nominatim will allow searching by OLC in the near
> future.
>
> Translation is this allows us to give every dwelling in Africa etc its own
> address.  It is not in itself a complete addressing solution since it
> doesn't handle things like 2nd floor but it does at least take you to the
> building.
>
> To make this work will require training material for example how to turn it
> on in OSMand.  It is not turned on by default.
>
> Because it is calculated from the buildings's latitude and longitude it is
> embedded in OSM and will not disappear.  It is stable so you can build on
> it.
>
> Now you need to think about how it can be used and what additional resources
> will be required to make full use of it.
>
> Cheerio John
>
>
>
>
>
>
> _______________________________________________
> HOT mailing list
> [hidden email]
> https://lists.openstreetmap.org/listinfo/hot
>



--
----------------------------------------------------
Blake Girardot
OSM Wiki - https://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/User:Bgirardot
HOTOSM Member - https://hotosm.org/users/blake_girardot
skype: jblakegirardot
_______________________________________________
HOT mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.openstreetmap.org/listinfo/hot

_______________________________________________
HOT mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.openstreetmap.org/listinfo/hot