Proposal to Change Road Classification, Road Surface, Road Condition, and Add Number of Lanes

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Proposal to Change Road Classification, Road Surface, Road Condition, and Add Number of Lanes

Alberto-4

Dear OSM staff, contributors, and users:

I have read the definitions, concepts and description that OSM uses to characterize (tag) roads and noticed that OSM does not establish the difference between inter-urban (rural) roads and urban roads (comprising mostly avenues and streets). Therefore, I propose to replace the existing OSM road classification with a "functional classification" that would allow OSM "to better model and better visualize" the actual road network. I have noticed that you have been challenged to adapt to the differences found in each country. If the following classification is adopted, it will be a "universal standard" and you will not need to adopt different criteria for developed or developing countries, like the OSM example for East Africa.

It would be useful to define a road class (paved/unpaved) and a road surface type (concrete, asphalt, surface treatment, gravel, earth). I also propose to reduce the options for road condition to only five categories defined by the need for maintenance or rehabilitation. I can provide a technical definition using the International Roughness Index (IRI) for paved and unpaved roads.


I am fully aware that these changes present a major challenge for the existing, coding, renderer, editors, etc. However, I am confident that introducing these changes (and adding the number of lanes) will not only simplify the mapping tasks, but would substantially improve the quality of the OMS products, particularly given the fact that many other layers are highly dependent on the quality of the road network.


I am a Civil Engineer (MS Stanford) with training on urban planning (MIT) with more than 20 years of experience working with international organizations like the World Bank and the African Development Bank on roads and highways in more than 50 countries, but mostly in Sub-Saharan Africa, South America, South Asia, East Asia and the Pacific, and Eastern Europe.

Alberto Nogales

202-257-8726


A. FUNCTIONAL ROAD CLASSIFICATION for "Motor Vehicles":


Rural (Inter-Urban) Roads - Located outside of urban areas

Classified Road Network. Generally falls under the responsibility of the National, Provincial (State), Municipal/Local Government to build, operate and maintain.

1. Primary Roads - National, Main, Trunk Roads outside of urban areas that connect the main population and economic centers of the country. Typically under the responsibility of the National Government and with high levels of traffic.

2. Secondary Roads - Regional, State, Provincial Roads are the main feeder routes into, and provide the main links between primary roads. Typically under the responsibility of the Provincial Government and with medium levels of traffic.

3. Tertiary Roads - Municipal, Local, Rural Roads that connect the smaller towns to intermediate cities. Typically under the responsibility of the Local Governments and with low levels of traffic.

Unclassified Road Network.

4. Unclassified Roads. Mostly private roads or of unknown responsibility to build and operate. Typically maintained by local communities or by private mining, forestry, or agricultural enterprises.

Urban Network- Located within the boundaries of urban areas

1/2/3. Highway. [Expressway, Motorways] Parts of the Primary, Secondary or Tertiary Roads that go across an urban area. Parts of the National, Provincial Network. Expressways with limited access. Typically no pedestrian or bicycle access.

5. Arterial. [Route, Boulevard] Connecting key areas of urban activity with higher traffic levels and longest trip lengths. High speeds with minimum interference to through movements, like those used by bus routes.

6. Collector. [Avenue] Provides land access and traffic circulation within urban areas. Penetrates neighborhoods, collecting and distributing traffic between neighborhoods and arterial network. Medium traffic levels with moderate trip lengths. Medium speeds with frequent interference to through movements.

7. Local. [Street] Road used to provide access to adjacent land and to the collector network and to higher order of streets. Lower traffic level with through traffic deliberately discouraged. Low speed.

8. Path. [Lane, Passage] Narrow mostly single lane in between buildings or behind a row of houses without sidewalks. Single direction and lowest level of traffic and lowest speed.

Add Classification for "Non-Motor Vehicles" that will not use the term road nor highways, like bicycle lane, pedestrian paths, etc.    


Total Road Network = Primary + Secondary + Tertiary + Unclassified + Urban


B. ROAD SURFACE CLASS (Paved/Unpaved) & ROAD SURFACE TYPE

1. Paved

1.1 Concrete

1.2 Asphalt

1.3 Surface Treatment

2. Unpaved

2.1 Gravel

2.2 Earth

C. ROAD CONDITION

1. Very Good. Roads do not require any capital costs. Recently completed and/or very good quality and high standard.

2. Good. Roads largely free of defects and require only minor maintenance work.

3. Fair. Road with defects that require periodic maintenance like resurfacing or regravelling, or grading.

4. Poor. Roads require partial rehabilitation, strengthening or partial reconstruction.

5. Very Poor.  Road requires full rehabilitation or full reconstruction.

D. NUMBER OF LANES AND/OR ROAD WIDTH. The functional classification can be further improved by providing the number of lanes and traffic flow direction, and the width of the main carriageway. it is also useful to indicate if the road is physically divided or not by a median or other. As for the urban roads indicate if the roads have sidewalks or not.

1. 1 LANE

2. 2 LANES

3. 3 LANES

4. 4 LANES

5. 5 LANES

6. 6  or more LANES


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Re: Proposal to Change Road Classification, Road Surface, Road Condition, and Add Number of Lanes

Tom Pfeifer
Alberto wrote on 2016/03/05 15:25:
> I [...] noticed that OSM does not establish the difference between inter-urban (rural)
> roads and urban roads (comprising mostly avenues and streets).

What advantage would we gain when making such distinction?

> If the following classification is adopted, it will be a "*universal standard*" and you

Reading your definitions they seem to be very focused on the US road network.
How universal are they?

> will not need to adopt different criteria for developed or developing countries,

You would still need to map the definitions to national road classification.

> like the OSM example for East Africa.

which example, specifically?

> It would be useful to define a road class (paved/unpaved) and
 > a road surface type (concrete, asphalt, surface treatment, gravel, earth).

surface=* already exists.

> ... reduce the options for road condition to only five categories

This is wishful thinking in OSM, since free tagging is allowed and helpful
to progress development.

> defined by the need for maintenance or rehabilitation.

This is not the purpose of OSM. We tag what we see on the ground, thus
the usability of the road.

OSM is not the primary tool for planning maintenance, though it may help of course.

> I am fully aware that these changes present a major challenge for the existing, coding, renderer, editors, etc.

I think it would lead to extreme confusion, which is not worth a marginal gain.

> and adding the number of lanes)

lanes=N already exist, complemented by lanes:forward=N and lanes:backward=N

> *B. ROAD SURFACE CLASS (Paved/Unpaved) & ROAD SURFACE TYPE*

surface=* already exists.

> *C. ROAD CONDITION*

smoothness=* already exists.

> *D. NUMBER OF LANES AND/OR *ROAD WIDTH*.

lanes=N already exists.
width=N already exists.

 > traffic flow direction,

lanes:forward=N and lanes:backward=N already exist
oneway=yes already exists, together with the road vector it maps the traffic flow direction

> useful to indicate if the road is physically
> divided or not by a median or other.

physically divided roads are mapped with separate way vectors, thus the
distinction already exists.

 > As for the urban roads indicate if the roads have sidewalks or not.

sidewalk=both/left/right already exists.

You started the mail with
 > I have read the definitions, concepts and description that OSM uses to characterize (tag) roads

What did you read?

Tom

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Re: Proposal to Change Road Classification, Road Surface, Road Condition, and Add Number of Lanes

dieterdreist
In reply to this post by Alberto-4


sent from a phone

> Am 05.03.2016 um 15:25 schrieb Alberto <[hidden email]>:
>
> OSM does not establish the difference between inter-urban (rural) roads and urban roads (comprising mostly avenues and streets).


there are tags in use that allow to make this distinction: source:maxspeed (if it's not signed ;-) ) and traffic_sign=city_limit


cheers,
Martin
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Re: Proposal to Change Road Classification, Road Surface, Road Condition, and Add Number of Lanes

moltonel 3x Combo


On 5 March 2016 21:13:48 GMT+00:00, Martin Koppenhoefer <[hidden email]> wrote:
>> Am 05.03.2016 um 15:25 schrieb Alberto <[hidden email]>:
>>
>> OSM does not establish the difference between inter-urban (rural)
>roads and urban roads (comprising mostly avenues and streets).
>
>
>there are tags in use that allow to make this distinction:
>source:maxspeed (if it's not signed ;-) ) and traffic_sign=city_limit

City limits rarely match the limits of urban areas. On one extreme there are multi-city agglomerations, on the other there are rural areas that are inside cities, for example in France where there is no "no-city's land", even the remotest countryside is part of a 'municipalité'.

That said, I dont see what would be gained in using completely separate highway classifications for urban/rural roads. The current scheme applies (as) well to both cases. It'd be silly to reclassify a road while it crosses a 'street village'. And I'm not looking forward to "where does the urban area start ?" debates.
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Re: Proposal to Change Road Classification, Road Surface, Road Condition, and Add Number of Lanes

dieterdreist


sent from a phone

> Am 06.03.2016 um 11:28 schrieb moltonel <[hidden email]>:
>
> City limits rarely match the limits of urban areas. On one extreme there are multi-city agglomerations, on the other there are rural areas that are inside cities, for example in France where there is no "no-city's land", even the remotest countryside is part of a 'municipalité'.


Actually there's 3 different kind of settlement: one for the law on traffic (sign city limit), one political (the place and the area around that it governs, municipalité) and the socio-geographical place, where someone would say he's inside this place.

The first one is the one that the OP has asked about I believe.

Cheers,
Martin
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Re: Proposal to Change Road Classification, Road Surface, Road Condition, and Add Number of Lanes

Colin Smale

In the UK you can add a fourth one to that list - where Royal Mail think you are, for the purposes of addressing post. Doesn't correspond to any of the first three options.

On 2016-03-06 16:21, Martin Koppenhoefer wrote:



sent from a phone

Am 06.03.2016 um 11:28 schrieb moltonel <[hidden email]>:

City limits rarely match the limits of urban areas. On one extreme there are multi-city agglomerations, on the other there are rural areas that are inside cities, for example in France where there is no "no-city's land", even the remotest countryside is part of a 'municipalité'.


Actually there's 3 different kind of settlement: one for the law on traffic (sign city limit), one political (the place and the area around that it governs, municipalité) and the socio-geographical place, where someone would say he's inside this place.

The first one is the one that the OP has asked about I believe.

Cheers,
Martin
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Re: Proposal to Change Road Classification, Road Surface, Road Condition, and Add Number of Lanes

Dominic Coletti

In the UK you can add a fourth one to that list - where Royal Mail think you are, for the purposes of addressing post. Doesn't correspond to any of the first three options.


This is similar in some pats of the US. USPS addresses are completely different from the other three.

On Sun, Mar 6, 2016 at 10:43 AM Colin Smale <[hidden email]> wrote:

In the UK you can add a fourth one to that list - where Royal Mail think you are, for the purposes of addressing post. Doesn't correspond to any of the first three options.

On 2016-03-06 16:21, Martin Koppenhoefer wrote:



sent from a phone

Am 06.03.2016 um 11:28 schrieb moltonel <[hidden email]>:

City limits rarely match the limits of urban areas. On one extreme there are multi-city agglomerations, on the other there are rural areas that are inside cities, for example in France where there is no "no-city's land", even the remotest countryside is part of a 'municipalité'.


Actually there's 3 different kind of settlement: one for the law on traffic (sign city limit), one political (the place and the area around that it governs, municipalité) and the socio-geographical place, where someone would say he's inside this place.

The first one is the one that the OP has asked about I believe.

Cheers,
Martin
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Re: Proposal to Change Road Classification, Road Surface, Road Condition, and Add Number of Lanes

AlaskaDave
You obviously did a lot of work in preparing your proposal and for that I thank you Alberto. However, I'm afraid I have to agree with Tom. To redefine the current highway tagging structure to the extent you suggest would be next to impossible given the free-thinking nature of many mappers, and any potential gains resulting from those changes would be minor compared to the amount of effort they would require to implement.

Some of the ideas you present will come up against stiff opposition as well. For example, separating urban and rural roads and combining dual carriageways are not ones I could support.

Regards,
Dave

On Mon, Mar 7, 2016 at 12:32 AM, Dominic Coletti <[hidden email]> wrote:

In the UK you can add a fourth one to that list - where Royal Mail think you are, for the purposes of addressing post. Doesn't correspond to any of the first three options.


This is similar in some pats of the US. USPS addresses are completely different from the other three.

On Sun, Mar 6, 2016 at 10:43 AM Colin Smale <[hidden email]> wrote:

In the UK you can add a fourth one to that list - where Royal Mail think you are, for the purposes of addressing post. Doesn't correspond to any of the first three options.

On 2016-03-06 16:21, Martin Koppenhoefer wrote:



sent from a phone

Am 06.03.2016 um 11:28 schrieb moltonel <[hidden email]>:

City limits rarely match the limits of urban areas. On one extreme there are multi-city agglomerations, on the other there are rural areas that are inside cities, for example in France where there is no "no-city's land", even the remotest countryside is part of a 'municipalité'.


Actually there's 3 different kind of settlement: one for the law on traffic (sign city limit), one political (the place and the area around that it governs, municipalité) and the socio-geographical place, where someone would say he's inside this place.

The first one is the one that the OP has asked about I believe.

Cheers,
Martin
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U.S. Air Force Auxiliary


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Chiang Mai, Thailand
Travel Blog at http://dswarthout.blogspot.com

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Re: Proposal to Change Road Classification, Road Surface, Road Condition, and Add Number of Lanes

Dominic Coletti
I truly find this proposal to be logical and well thought out. However, I think that there may be better ways to pursue these goals other than replacing the millions of ways on OSM tagged with the current schema. That said, I think there is room to add new tags that serves a similar purpose to what you describe.

Sincerely,
Dominic

On Sun, Mar 6, 2016 at 7:39 PM Dave Swarthout <[hidden email]> wrote:
You obviously did a lot of work in preparing your proposal and for that I thank you Alberto. However, I'm afraid I have to agree with Tom. To redefine the current highway tagging structure to the extent you suggest would be next to impossible given the free-thinking nature of many mappers, and any potential gains resulting from those changes would be minor compared to the amount of effort they would require to implement.

Some of the ideas you present will come up against stiff opposition as well. For example, separating urban and rural roads and combining dual carriageways are not ones I could support.

Regards,
Dave

On Mon, Mar 7, 2016 at 12:32 AM, Dominic Coletti <[hidden email]> wrote:

In the UK you can add a fourth one to that list - where Royal Mail think you are, for the purposes of addressing post. Doesn't correspond to any of the first three options.


This is similar in some pats of the US. USPS addresses are completely different from the other three.

On Sun, Mar 6, 2016 at 10:43 AM Colin Smale <[hidden email]> wrote:

In the UK you can add a fourth one to that list - where Royal Mail think you are, for the purposes of addressing post. Doesn't correspond to any of the first three options.

On 2016-03-06 16:21, Martin Koppenhoefer wrote:



sent from a phone

Am 06.03.2016 um 11:28 schrieb moltonel <[hidden email]>:

City limits rarely match the limits of urban areas. On one extreme there are multi-city agglomerations, on the other there are rural areas that are inside cities, for example in France where there is no "no-city's land", even the remotest countryside is part of a 'municipalité'.


Actually there's 3 different kind of settlement: one for the law on traffic (sign city limit), one political (the place and the area around that it governs, municipalité) and the socio-geographical place, where someone would say he's inside this place.

The first one is the one that the OP has asked about I believe.

Cheers,
Martin
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Whiskey Flight Sergeant, Raleigh-Wake Composite Squadron
(H) <a href="tel:919-463-9554" value="+19194639554" target="_blank">919-463-9554
U.S. Air Force Auxiliary


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Chiang Mai, Thailand
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Re: Proposal to Change Road Classification, Road Surface, Road Condition, and Add Number of Lanes

David Bannon-2
In reply to this post by Alberto-4
Wow Alberto, you have put a lot of thought into this. I agree its needed and think the model would serve us a lot better than the way its done now. But I see a couple of problems, first, we have a huge data set using the existing model. Very hard to change that. Secondly, I suspect not all contributers to OSM are familiar with the sort of roads that have prompted your proposal. So, wide spread support may be a bit hard to find.

But I'd be the last to suggest you give up something just because its impossible !

So, lets pick it over.

Firstly, maybe your categories might need to be a bit finer grained.  For example, the jump, in Rural, 3 Tertiary and 4 Unclassified is too big. I live on a rural road, its not a connecting road and it is owned and maintained (occasionally) by the Municipality.  So its definitely a public access road but not one a routing engine should consider (except start and end stages of course). Such roads are very common.

I am not sure I like the classification you use for C Road Condition. It seems a bit too focused on maintenance models rather than providing an indication of how a traveler might find it. I suggest what a map (or whatever) user wants to know is "should I use this road ?". And that, of course, is dependent on vehicle, maybe affected by weather, maintenance cycles and so on.

Alberto, I'd like to see this model refined, lets make out that we are starting fresh, get it right and then look to see if some of the result can be incorporated into the current model, or even a long term transition ?

David

On 06/03/16 01:25, Alberto wrote:

Dear OSM staff, contributors, and users:

I have read the definitions, concepts and description that OSM uses to characterize (tag) roads and noticed that OSM does not establish the difference between inter-urban (rural) roads and urban roads (comprising mostly avenues and streets). Therefore, I propose to replace the existing OSM road classification with a "functional classification" that would allow OSM "to better model and better visualize" the actual road network. I have noticed that you have been challenged to adapt to the differences found in each country. If the following classification is adopted, it will be a "universal standard" and you will not need to adopt different criteria for developed or developing countries, like the OSM example for East Africa.

It would be useful to define a road class (paved/unpaved) and a road surface type (concrete, asphalt, surface treatment, gravel, earth). I also propose to reduce the options for road condition to only five categories defined by the need for maintenance or rehabilitation. I can provide a technical definition using the International Roughness Index (IRI) for paved and unpaved roads.


I am fully aware that these changes present a major challenge for the existing, coding, renderer, editors, etc. However, I am confident that introducing these changes (and adding the number of lanes) will not only simplify the mapping tasks, but would substantially improve the quality of the OMS products, particularly given the fact that many other layers are highly dependent on the quality of the road network.


I am a Civil Engineer (MS Stanford) with training on urban planning (MIT) with more than 20 years of experience working with international organizations like the World Bank and the African Development Bank on roads and highways in more than 50 countries, but mostly in Sub-Saharan Africa, South America, South Asia, East Asia and the Pacific, and Eastern Europe.

Alberto Nogales

202-257-8726


A. FUNCTIONAL ROAD CLASSIFICATION for "Motor Vehicles":


Rural (Inter-Urban) Roads - Located outside of urban areas

Classified Road Network. Generally falls under the responsibility of the National, Provincial (State), Municipal/Local Government to build, operate and maintain.

1. Primary Roads - National, Main, Trunk Roads outside of urban areas that connect the main population and economic centers of the country. Typically under the responsibility of the National Government and with high levels of traffic.

2. Secondary Roads - Regional, State, Provincial Roads are the main feeder routes into, and provide the main links between primary roads. Typically under the responsibility of the Provincial Government and with medium levels of traffic.

3. Tertiary Roads - Municipal, Local, Rural Roads that connect the smaller towns to intermediate cities. Typically under the responsibility of the Local Governments and with low levels of traffic.

Unclassified Road Network.

4. Unclassified Roads. Mostly private roads or of unknown responsibility to build and operate. Typically maintained by local communities or by private mining, forestry, or agricultural enterprises.

Urban Network- Located within the boundaries of urban areas

1/2/3. Highway. [Expressway, Motorways] Parts of the Primary, Secondary or Tertiary Roads that go across an urban area. Parts of the National, Provincial Network. Expressways with limited access. Typically no pedestrian or bicycle access.

5. Arterial. [Route, Boulevard] Connecting key areas of urban activity with higher traffic levels and longest trip lengths. High speeds with minimum interference to through movements, like those used by bus routes.

6. Collector. [Avenue] Provides land access and traffic circulation within urban areas. Penetrates neighborhoods, collecting and distributing traffic between neighborhoods and arterial network. Medium traffic levels with moderate trip lengths. Medium speeds with frequent interference to through movements.

7. Local. [Street] Road used to provide access to adjacent land and to the collector network and to higher order of streets. Lower traffic level with through traffic deliberately discouraged. Low speed.

8. Path. [Lane, Passage] Narrow mostly single lane in between buildings or behind a row of houses without sidewalks. Single direction and lowest level of traffic and lowest speed.

Add Classification for "Non-Motor Vehicles" that will not use the term road nor highways, like bicycle lane, pedestrian paths, etc.    


Total Road Network = Primary + Secondary + Tertiary + Unclassified + Urban


B. ROAD SURFACE CLASS (Paved/Unpaved) & ROAD SURFACE TYPE

1. Paved

1.1 Concrete

1.2 Asphalt

1.3 Surface Treatment

2. Unpaved

2.1 Gravel

2.2 Earth

C. ROAD CONDITION

1. Very Good. Roads do not require any capital costs. Recently completed and/or very good quality and high standard.

2. Good. Roads largely free of defects and require only minor maintenance work.

3. Fair. Road with defects that require periodic maintenance like resurfacing or regravelling, or grading.

4. Poor. Roads require partial rehabilitation, strengthening or partial reconstruction.

5. Very Poor.  Road requires full rehabilitation or full reconstruction.

D. NUMBER OF LANES AND/OR ROAD WIDTH. The functional classification can be further improved by providing the number of lanes and traffic flow direction, and the width of the main carriageway. it is also useful to indicate if the road is physically divided or not by a median or other. As for the urban roads indicate if the roads have sidewalks or not.

1. 1 LANE

2. 2 LANES

3. 3 LANES

4. 4 LANES

5. 5 LANES

6. 6  or more LANES



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