SuDS (Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems)

classic Classic list List threaded Threaded
3 messages Options
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

SuDS (Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems)

sk53.osm
Last night before visiting the pub we had a look at part of Sheffield's "Grey-to-Green" SuDS system. Unfortunately all my batteries ad packed up at this point, but there are some decent pictures on twitter.
The bit we looked at was outside the courthouses. It consisted of :
  • A bio-swale. Planted with a colourful mixture of plants most of which I've forgotten now, although I do recall Jerusalem Sage. The ground was a gravel mix with presumably a geo-membrane underneath to retain water. A few birches were also planted along the length of the swale. Superficially this just looks from a distance like a large ornamental flower bed.
  • Concrete 'dams' periodically, along the swale, rising to within a few inches of pavement level and with a v-shaped notch in the centre. Obviously these are not really dams, more a type of weir, being designed to moderate the flow of water through pooling behind each dam. I've seen similar constructions in the Alps albeit on a larger scale. 
  • At the bottom of the swale a more obvious drainage channel. Where the swale is broken for pedestrian access this runs in a recessed gutter covered by a grille.
There are probably other features of the completed scheme which we didn't see. I notice many new-build housing estates will have an area set aside as a water retention basin.

I've previously noted a SuDS along Ribblesdale Road in Nottingham, but the features involved are on too small a scale to consider mapping for now.

This type of infrastructure is becoming much more popular, particularly with extreme flooding events due to surface run-off. I'd hoped to look at the one in Sheffield, and fortunately Laura both remembered this and where it was. Larger ones are relatively simple to map the main features, choosing viable & appropriate tags is more challenging. I've had a go, but am very open to other suggestions. I suspect the whole swale should be mapped as a waterway feature. For now I've used waterway=drain with intermittent=yes for the channel in the swale & the connecting part of the drain running in a covered gutter (one import in Santa Clara Co, CA opted for waterway=stream). However many of the features could use man-made rather than waterway tags. 

In conclusion: there's probably a SuDS near you; they're hard to tag (for know); but not too hard to map; we could do with thinking about better tags.

Regards,

Jerry



_______________________________________________
Talk-GB mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.openstreetmap.org/listinfo/talk-gb
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: SuDS (Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems)

Jez Nicholson
My client GeoSmart are experts on SuDS, further reading at https://geosmartinfo.co.uk/knowledge-hub/sustainable-drainage-systems/

Many/most planning applications for new developments now have to mitigate the drainage area that has been lost to houses/drives/roads/etc. It can be difficult to identify a SuDS installation as they are deliberately blended into the site. It might just be a pond at the bottom of a larger dipped area that'll take some of the bite out of a flash flood.



On Wed, Jun 19, 2019 at 2:46 PM SK53 <[hidden email]> wrote:
Last night before visiting the pub we had a look at part of Sheffield's "Grey-to-Green" SuDS system. Unfortunately all my batteries ad packed up at this point, but there are some decent pictures on twitter.
The bit we looked at was outside the courthouses. It consisted of :
  • A bio-swale. Planted with a colourful mixture of plants most of which I've forgotten now, although I do recall Jerusalem Sage. The ground was a gravel mix with presumably a geo-membrane underneath to retain water. A few birches were also planted along the length of the swale. Superficially this just looks from a distance like a large ornamental flower bed.
  • Concrete 'dams' periodically, along the swale, rising to within a few inches of pavement level and with a v-shaped notch in the centre. Obviously these are not really dams, more a type of weir, being designed to moderate the flow of water through pooling behind each dam. I've seen similar constructions in the Alps albeit on a larger scale. 
  • At the bottom of the swale a more obvious drainage channel. Where the swale is broken for pedestrian access this runs in a recessed gutter covered by a grille.
There are probably other features of the completed scheme which we didn't see. I notice many new-build housing estates will have an area set aside as a water retention basin.

I've previously noted a SuDS along Ribblesdale Road in Nottingham, but the features involved are on too small a scale to consider mapping for now.

This type of infrastructure is becoming much more popular, particularly with extreme flooding events due to surface run-off. I'd hoped to look at the one in Sheffield, and fortunately Laura both remembered this and where it was. Larger ones are relatively simple to map the main features, choosing viable & appropriate tags is more challenging. I've had a go, but am very open to other suggestions. I suspect the whole swale should be mapped as a waterway feature. For now I've used waterway=drain with intermittent=yes for the channel in the swale & the connecting part of the drain running in a covered gutter (one import in Santa Clara Co, CA opted for waterway=stream). However many of the features could use man-made rather than waterway tags. 

In conclusion: there's probably a SuDS near you; they're hard to tag (for know); but not too hard to map; we could do with thinking about better tags.

Regards,

Jerry


_______________________________________________
Talk-GB mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.openstreetmap.org/listinfo/talk-gb

_______________________________________________
Talk-GB mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.openstreetmap.org/listinfo/talk-gb
Reply | Threaded
Open this post in threaded view
|

Re: SuDS (Sustainable Urban Drainage Systems)

Warin
The area I would tag as a landuse=basin, basin=detention/retension/infiltration. That is what I have done around me.
Most of these are larger than your example, the largest one that I know of is https://www.openstreetmap.org/way/282846991.

Some sports field are used as a detention pond when high rates of rain fall cause the drainage system to back up, the over flow is held by the low lying sports field for later drainage. I have left these alone - a temporary use that won't often be seen I hope.

On 20/06/19 00:09, Jez Nicholson wrote:
My client GeoSmart are experts on SuDS, further reading at https://geosmartinfo.co.uk/knowledge-hub/sustainable-drainage-systems/

Many/most planning applications for new developments now have to mitigate the drainage area that has been lost to houses/drives/roads/etc. It can be difficult to identify a SuDS installation as they are deliberately blended into the site. It might just be a pond at the bottom of a larger dipped area that'll take some of the bite out of a flash flood.



On Wed, Jun 19, 2019 at 2:46 PM SK53 <[hidden email]> wrote:
Last night before visiting the pub we had a look at part of Sheffield's "Grey-to-Green" SuDS system. Unfortunately all my batteries ad packed up at this point, but there are some decent pictures on twitter.
The bit we looked at was outside the courthouses. It consisted of :
  • A bio-swale. Planted with a colourful mixture of plants most of which I've forgotten now, although I do recall Jerusalem Sage. The ground was a gravel mix with presumably a geo-membrane underneath to retain water. A few birches were also planted along the length of the swale. Superficially this just looks from a distance like a large ornamental flower bed.
  • Concrete 'dams' periodically, along the swale, rising to within a few inches of pavement level and with a v-shaped notch in the centre. Obviously these are not really dams, more a type of weir, being designed to moderate the flow of water through pooling behind each dam. I've seen similar constructions in the Alps albeit on a larger scale. 
  • At the bottom of the swale a more obvious drainage channel. Where the swale is broken for pedestrian access this runs in a recessed gutter covered by a grille.
There are probably other features of the completed scheme which we didn't see. I notice many new-build housing estates will have an area set aside as a water retention basin.

I've previously noted a SuDS along Ribblesdale Road in Nottingham, but the features involved are on too small a scale to consider mapping for now.

This type of infrastructure is becoming much more popular, particularly with extreme flooding events due to surface run-off. I'd hoped to look at the one in Sheffield, and fortunately Laura both remembered this and where it was. Larger ones are relatively simple to map the main features, choosing viable & appropriate tags is more challenging. I've had a go, but am very open to other suggestions. I suspect the whole swale should be mapped as a waterway feature. For now I've used waterway=drain with intermittent=yes for the channel in the swale & the connecting part of the drain running in a covered gutter (one import in Santa Clara Co, CA opted for waterway=stream). However many of the features could use man-made rather than waterway tags. 

In conclusion: there's probably a SuDS near you; they're hard to tag (for know); but not too hard to map; we could do with thinking about better tags.

Regards,

Jerry


_______________________________________________
Talk-GB mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.openstreetmap.org/listinfo/talk-gb


_______________________________________________
Talk-GB mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.openstreetmap.org/listinfo/talk-gb



_______________________________________________
Talk-GB mailing list
[hidden email]
https://lists.openstreetmap.org/listinfo/talk-gb