motel vs. hotel

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motel vs. hotel

Peter Dobratz
How do you distinguish between the tourism=hotel and tourism=motel tags?

The criteria that I was imagining is that a motel is a single story building where you have the ability to park you car directly outside of your room. A hotel would be other types of buildings such as multi-story where most guests cannot park directly outside their room.

There's the curious case of the two Motel 6 facilities directly across the road from each other.  I had marked these as tourism=hotel based on the building architecture, but maybe all Motel 6's should be tourism=motel?


What do you think?

Thanks,
Peter


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Re: motel vs. hotel

Shawn K. Quinn
On 3/8/19 18:47, Peter Dobratz wrote:
> How do you distinguish between the tourism=hotel and tourism=motel tags?
>
> The criteria that I was imagining is that a motel is a single story
> building where you have the ability to park you car directly outside of
> your room. A hotel would be other types of buildings such as multi-story
> where most guests cannot park directly outside their room.

Some motels have two- or even three-story buildings. For me, the
defining difference would be that a hotel is closer to an airport or
business district and either has limited parking or charges for parking,
whereas motels as I know them never charge for parking, and are often
farther away from the business districts and airports.

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Re: motel vs. hotel

Kevin Broderick
I thought the defining architectural difference was whether access to the room was via interior hallway (hotel) or exterior walkway (motel).

On Fri, Mar 8, 2019, 19:51 Shawn K. Quinn <[hidden email]> wrote:
On 3/8/19 18:47, Peter Dobratz wrote:
> How do you distinguish between the tourism=hotel and tourism=motel tags?
>
> The criteria that I was imagining is that a motel is a single story
> building where you have the ability to park you car directly outside of
> your room. A hotel would be other types of buildings such as multi-story
> where most guests cannot park directly outside their room.

Some motels have two- or even three-story buildings. For me, the
defining difference would be that a hotel is closer to an airport or
business district and either has limited parking or charges for parking,
whereas motels as I know them never charge for parking, and are often
farther away from the business districts and airports.

--
Shawn K. Quinn <[hidden email]>
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http://www.skqrecordquest.com

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Re: motel vs. hotel

Ian Dees
In reply to this post by Peter Dobratz
I think your description of motels as parking directly outside rooms is good, but I've seen plenty of motels that had multiple stories.

Wikipedia's page on motels is good and has this definition:

"a type of hotel consisting of a single building of connected rooms whose doors faced a parking lot and in some circumstances, a common area or a series of small cabins with common parking"

On Fri, Mar 8, 2019 at 6:49 PM Peter Dobratz <[hidden email]> wrote:
How do you distinguish between the tourism=hotel and tourism=motel tags?

The criteria that I was imagining is that a motel is a single story building where you have the ability to park you car directly outside of your room. A hotel would be other types of buildings such as multi-story where most guests cannot park directly outside their room.

There's the curious case of the two Motel 6 facilities directly across the road from each other.  I had marked these as tourism=hotel based on the building architecture, but maybe all Motel 6's should be tourism=motel?


What do you think?

Thanks,
Peter

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Re: motel vs. hotel

Tod Fitch
In reply to this post by Peter Dobratz
For me the difference is interior hallway to access room (hotel) vs exterior access to each room (motel).


On March 8, 2019 4:47:33 PM PST, Peter Dobratz <[hidden email]> wrote:
How do you distinguish between the tourism=hotel and tourism=motel tags?

The criteria that I was imagining is that a motel is a single story building where you have the ability to park you car directly outside of your room. A hotel would be other types of buildings such as multi-story where most guests cannot park directly outside their room.

There's the curious case of the two Motel 6 facilities directly across the road from each other.  I had marked these as tourism=hotel based on the building architecture, but maybe all Motel 6's should be tourism=motel?


What do you think?

Thanks,
Peter


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Re: motel vs. hotel

Martijn van Exel-3
I've slept in some pretty nice places that had exterior room access. I wouldn't call that out as the only demarcating property. To my mind it's a combination of location, amenities and layout / architecture.

Interesting discussion!

Martijn van Exel

On Mar 8, 2019, at 18:03, Tod Fitch <[hidden email]> wrote:

For me the difference is interior hallway to access room (hotel) vs exterior access to each room (motel).


On March 8, 2019 4:47:33 PM PST, Peter Dobratz <[hidden email]> wrote:
How do you distinguish between the tourism=hotel and tourism=motel tags?

The criteria that I was imagining is that a motel is a single story building where you have the ability to park you car directly outside of your room. A hotel would be other types of buildings such as multi-story where most guests cannot park directly outside their room.

There's the curious case of the two Motel 6 facilities directly across the road from each other.  I had marked these as tourism=hotel based on the building architecture, but maybe all Motel 6's should be tourism=motel?


What do you think?

Thanks,
Peter


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Re: motel vs. hotel

Joseph Eisenberg
This was discussed at the main Tagging mailing list a couple of months ago:

Start of thread:
https://lists.openstreetmap.org/pipermail/tagging/2018-December/041597.html
Continuation in January:
https://lists.openstreetmap.org/pipermail/tagging/2019-January/041720.html

The wiki page for Motel was updated at that time:
https://wiki.openstreetmap.org/wiki/Tag%3Atourism%3Dmotel

A number of people said that the name on the sign is the main way to
distinguish a hotel vs a motel, but some thought that the easy access
to no-fee motor vehicle parking from the rooms was also a useful
distinction.


On 3/9/19, Martijn van Exel <[hidden email]> wrote:

> I've slept in some pretty nice places that had exterior room access. I
> wouldn't call that out as the only demarcating property. To my mind it's a
> combination of location, amenities and layout / architecture.
>
> Interesting discussion!
>
> Martijn van Exel
>
>> On Mar 8, 2019, at 18:03, Tod Fitch <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>
>> For me the difference is interior hallway to access room (hotel) vs
>> exterior access to each room (motel).
>>
>>
>>> On March 8, 2019 4:47:33 PM PST, Peter Dobratz <[hidden email]> wrote:
>>> How do you distinguish between the tourism=hotel and tourism=motel tags?
>>>
>>> The criteria that I was imagining is that a motel is a single story
>>> building where you have the ability to park you car directly outside of
>>> your room. A hotel would be other types of buildings such as multi-story
>>> where most guests cannot park directly outside their room.
>>>
>>> There's the curious case of the two Motel 6 facilities directly across
>>> the road from each other.  I had marked these as tourism=hotel based on
>>> the building architecture, but maybe all Motel 6's should be
>>> tourism=motel?
>>>
>>> https://www.openstreetmap.org/note/1645570
>>>
>>> What do you think?
>>>
>>> Thanks,
>>> Peter
>>>
>>
>> --
>> Sent from my Android device with K-9 Mail. Please excuse my brevity.
>> _______________________________________________
>> Talk-us mailing list
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>

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Re: motel vs. hotel

stevea
In reply to this post by Peter Dobratz
As I believe the etymology of the word "motel" (circa 1920s) is a contraction of "motor hotel," I believe it is fair to say that a motel is a hotel which caters to motorists.  That is, patrons who arrive in an automobile and wish for it to be immediately accessible, as in parked directly outside the room in the case of a single story facility, or very nearby for multiple story.

Others say hotels are "closer to an airport or business district" and while this is a more general criterion, (think of resort hotels where you do not arrive in your automobile as an exception, for example), I believe that "caters to motorists" is the defining difference for motels.

SteveA
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Re: motel vs. hotel

Bryan Housel-2
In reply to this post by Peter Dobratz
Good question!
As others have said - hotels have rooms that open indoors, motels have rooms that open outdoors.  That’s the only difference.

I did a bit of research on this last year for https://github.com/osmlab/name-suggestion-index because we are using this project to capture the recommended tagging for all the brands of the world.

Check out the hotel/motel files here if you are curious!

For example:
Super 8 is almost always tagged as `tourism=motel`, and Travelodge is almost always tagged as `tourism=hotel`, even though both brands often exist in either kind of building.

I think this is one of those tags where it really doesn’t matter much which one people use.

Bryan



On Mar 8, 2019, at 7:47 PM, Peter Dobratz <[hidden email]> wrote:

How do you distinguish between the tourism=hotel and tourism=motel tags?

The criteria that I was imagining is that a motel is a single story building where you have the ability to park you car directly outside of your room. A hotel would be other types of buildings such as multi-story where most guests cannot park directly outside their room.

There's the curious case of the two Motel 6 facilities directly across the road from each other.  I had marked these as tourism=hotel based on the building architecture, but maybe all Motel 6's should be tourism=motel?


What do you think?

Thanks,
Peter

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Re: motel vs. hotel

idnwys
In reply to this post by Peter Dobratz

>> As I believe the etymology of the word "motel" (circa 1920s) is a contraction

>> of "motor hotel," I believe it is fair to say that a motel is a hotel which

>> caters to motorists.  That is, patrons who arrive in an automobile and wish

>> for it to be immediately accessible, as in parked directly outside the room

>> in the case of a single story facility, or very nearby for multiple story.

 

Pretty much this.  I would define a motel as a place you would stay at just to

rest and shower while on a long, multiple day, drive.  Like driving from the

East coast to the West coast in USA without extra stops.  Simply a room to stay

in with possible a common area that provides cold breakfast

(cereal/bagels/etc.).

 

A hotel would be more somewhere you would stay at for multiple days in a row on

a vacation or business trip.  These usually have extra features (hot

breakfast/pool/room service/etc.).

 

Aaron Forsythe


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Re: motel vs. hotel

Brian Stromberg
The only clear definition that has come across this list is whether the rooms open to the outdoors or to a hallway. All of the others are way too subjective to be useful to anyone trying to decide how to tag it.

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Re: motel vs. hotel

Jack Burke-2
"Motel" is a contraction of "motor hotel." The term motor hotel originated with the idea of a hotel that you drove up and parked outside the door to your room.

So, the original defining characteristic of a motel is a hotel with doors opening outside to the parking lot.

Today, many motels are multi-story, and some have rooms facing an interior courtyard, but I'd still call them motels, and retain the term "hotel" for lodging facilities with rooms opening to an interior hallway.

Fun fact: the word "hotel" is descended from the middle French word "hostel," and both words are in active use in modern French, but with slightly different meanings.

-Jack

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On March 9, 2019 8:41:38 AM CST, Brian Stromberg <[hidden email]> wrote:
The only clear definition that has come across this list is whether the rooms open to the outdoors or to a hallway. All of the others are way too subjective to be useful to anyone trying to decide how to tag it.

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Brian
 
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